Calendar

America’s history of racial inequality continues to undermine fair treatment, equal justice, and opportunity for many Americans. The Equal Justice Initiative (EJI) believes we must acknowledge the truth about our history before we can heal: truth and reconciliation are sequential.

As a nation, we have not yet acknowledged our history of racial injustice, including the genocide of Native people, the legacy of slavery and racial terror, and the legally-supported abuse of racial minorities.

When we engage truthfully with our history, we are better equipped to address contemporary issues ranging from mass incarceration, immigration, and human rights to how we think and talk about cultural moments and icons.

EJI designed A History of Racial Injustice as a set of tools for learning more about people and events in American history that are critically important but not well known. This digital experience highlights events on this day in history with rich detail and intuitive sharing features. Find the daily /monthly calendar here

Racial Justice Events in Marin

Click on an event in the calendar above for full details:


Tuesday, Dec 10, 6pm – 8pm, Seeing White podcast discussion, Episodes 13 & 14 Aroma Cafe, 1122 4th St., San Rafael 

Join us for a guided discussion of the episodes 13 & 14 of the excellent and eye-opening podcast series Seeing White from SceneOnRadio. We ask that you listen to the podcast episodes, and we will talk together about them and the information learned.  Unfamiliar with podcasts? Don’t worry!  You can listen to the episodes on a computer HERE, or you can search it on your podcast app on iPhone, iTunes or Android.  RSVP here Bring a friend and join the conversation!

Hear the series at www.sceneonradio.org/seeing-white/ Just what is going on with white people? Police shootings of unarmed African Americans. Acts of domestic terrorism by white supremacists. The renewed embrace of raw, undisguised white-identity politics. Unending racial inequity in schools, housing, criminal justice, and hiring. Some of this feels new, but in truth it’s an old story. Why? Where did the notion of “whiteness” come from? What does it mean? What is whiteness for?

The Pushouts – Free Community Cinema at the Rafael Theater, 1118 4th St., San Rafael. Monday, Dec 16, 12 noon. Get your free ticket online here.

Referred to as high school “dropouts” in national statistics and common parlance, many of these youth are actually “pushouts,” trying to stay enrolled in school against the odds. The Pushouts tells the story of the one-in-three Latino and Black students nationally who do not graduate, are pushed into continuation schools, low-paying jobs, and—too often—the criminal justice and mass incarceration systems. It also tells the remarkable story of Victor Rios’ evolution from school pushout and Oakland gang member to UC professor, author, and thought leader on the school-to-prison pipeline.

Discussion and Q&A immediately following the screening with director/producer/writer Katie Galloway and producer/co-director Dawn Valadez.


Sunday, December 22, 3:00 – 4:30pm, Racial justice book discussion: San Rafael Library , 1100 E St Dear America, Notes of an Undocumented Citizen, by Jose Antonio Vargas. Discussions are open to everyone – find more information here.

Pulitzer-Prize winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas, called “the most famous undocumented immigrant in America,” tackles one of the defining issues of our time in this explosive and deeply personal call to arms.

Pulitzer-Prize winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas, called “the most famous undocumented immigrant in America,” tackles one of the defining issues of our time in this explosive and deeply personal call to arms. 

“This is not a book about the politics of immigration. This book––at its core––is not about immigration at all. This book is about homelessness, not in a traditional sense, but in the unsettled, unmoored psychological state that undocumented immigrants like myself find ourselves in. This book is about lying and being forced to lie to get by; about passing as an American and as a contributing citizen; about families, keeping them together, and having to make new ones when you can’t. This book is about constantly hiding from the government and, in the process, hiding from ourselves. This book is about what it means to not have a home.



True Justice – Free Community Cinema at the Rafael Theater, 1118 4th St., San Rafael. Monday, Jan 27, 12 noon. Get your free ticket online here.

True Justice follows the personal journey of Bryan Stevenson, a public defender in Alabama and founder of the Equal Justice Initiative, who is working to bring justice to the incarcerated, wrongfully convicted, and disadvantaged. Weaving together Stevenson’s own story, those of his clients, and a history of injustice and complicity by our justice system, the film reveals how a narrative of racial inequality emerged in this country. Stevenson challenges us to seek the truth, confront it, and work towards reconciliation.

Discussion to follow screening with special guest Rabbi Paul Shleffar, Jewish Chaplain, San Quentin State Prison


Find news on upcoming events and actions throughout the Bay Area at SURJ Bay Area’s website!